Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Cosmetic Dermatology and Hair Care San Antonio, Texas, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Komenan Kassi

University of Felix Houphouët Boigny Abidjan-Côte d’Ivoire( Ivory Coast )

Keynote: Squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip in an old black African woman

Time : 10:00-10:50

OMICS International Cosmetic Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Komenan Kassi photo
Biography:

Kassi Komenan is an Assistant Professor at Department of Dermatology and Infectiology, Felix Houphouet Boigny college Abidjan, Cote d Ivoire. His worldwide experience incorporates different projects, commitments and cooperation in various nations for assorted fields of study. His examination advantages reflect in his extensive variety of distributions in different national and worldwide diaries.

Abstract:

Introduction: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lower lip is the most frequent cancer of the oral cavity in the elderly. The potential etiologic factors are pipe-smoking, tobacco-chewing and chronic alcohol consumption. They grow slowly and are easily diagnosed. But, they can lead to functional, esthetical complications and to death when diagnosed and treated lately. Case Report: Here, we report a case of SCC of the lower lip in a black woman aged of 82 year-old evolving for 10 years, associated with tobacco use for over 40 years. The clinical examination noted: a large, bourgeoning and ulcerated tumor covering the 2/3 part of the lower lip with irregular raised indurate borders which bleed when traumatized, without regional lymph node and distant metastasis. The patient was treated with wide surgical excision associated with V to Y advancement flap added to nasolabial island flap, and healed within 4 weeks, with good aesthetic and functional results without any recurrences after 2 years follow up time.
Conclusion: The late diagnosis of SCC makes its treatment difficult and expensive in limited resource countries like Côted’Ivoire. Therefore, it is necessary to set up a preventive strategy to detect the disease in its initial stage to promptly institute effective and efficient care.

  • Cosmetology : Herbal and Ayurvedic approach | Dermatological Diseases | Skin Cancer and Cosmetic Dermatology | Hair Care
Location: Hall C
Speaker

Chair

Sonhee Park

Shaklee Corporation, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Komenan Kassi

University of Felix Houphout Boigny Abidjan-Cte dIvoire( Ivory Coast )

Session Introduction

Elizabeth Gyurke

University of Toledo, USA

Title: Title: Formulating moisturizing creams for skin of color

Time : 11:10-11:45

Biography:

Gabriella Baki is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She serves as the Program Director and main Instructor in the BSPS Cosmetic Science and Formulation Design. She is a Pharmacist, graduated in 2008 from the University of Szeged, Hungary and also did PhD from the same university. Her research area focuses on cosmetics and personal care products as well as topical pharmaceutical products with the ultimate goals of enhancing consumer experience, patient adherence as well as product appeal and performance. She has made several technical presentations and over a dozen poster presentations. She has written 24 publications, has contributed to book chapters and had her first book, Introduction to Cosmetic Formulation and Technology, published by John Wiley and Sons last year.

Abstract:

Background: In people with Fitzpatrick type IV to VI skin, dry skin can be associated with a grayish-whitish coloring, a reduction in skin shininess and even flaking in more severe cases. This condition is usually referred to as “ashy” skin. This is considered a cosmetic problem; however, it can be distressing affecting patients’ quality of life and in severe cases it can lead to further problems. There is not a wide variety of moisturizers on the market specifically designed for skin of color, which skin type usually desires a thicker, creamier moisturizer to combat dry skin symptoms.
Aims: The main goals of this study were to design moisturizing creams for skin of color and study how formulation technology affects product quality and stability.
Methods: First, a detailed review of marketed products was performed to identify key moisturizing ingredients for skin of color. After identifying the main moisturizing ingredients, other necessary ingredients were selected to formulate moisturizing creams.
Results: Multiple batches of creams were formulated with varying the processing parameters (including mixing speed, speed of
adding the water phase, using liquid vs. solid shea butter, use of water bath, and amount of oil/aqueous phase included) and the creams were tested for aesthetics, viscosity, droplet size distribution and physical stability.
Conclusions: This study showed that processing parameters and technology significantly affects the physicochemical characteristics and physical stability of moisturizing creams

Speaker
Biography:

Sonhee Park has completed her PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry and Post-doctoral fellowship from the Ohio State University. She is a Senior Research Scientist of Shaklee Corporation. She has published 27 papers in refereed journals and book chapters

Abstract:

Muscadine extract (ME) was uniquely developed as an ingredient for topical skin care cosmetic application. The ME was decolorized, deodorized, and standardized to 9% total polyphenol content. The IC50 of ME activity on elastase was 0.056%, demonstrating 100% inhibition at 0.5% and 1% ME. The IC50 of ME on collagenase activity was 0.28%, demonstrating 69% inhibition at 0.5% ME and 79% at 1% ME. When the antioxidant capacity was measured using DPPH assay, ME at 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 % showed 1926, 1943, 1944, and 1920 μM Trolox equivalents, respectively. When MatTek EpiDerm tissue was treated with 0.1% and 1% ME prior to the UVB exposure, thymine dimer formation was significantly reduced by 35% and 100%, respectively, while 45% reduction in thymine dimer formation was observed when the tissue was treated with 1% ME after the UVB insult. When keratinocyte cells were treated with 0.01, 0.05, and 0.1% ME before the UVB exposure, cell survival was significantly increased than untreated cells as measured by MTT assay, showing 82%, 88% and 100% cell viability, respectively, as compared to 61% viability in untreated cells. These results suggest that this novel muscadine extract developed for topical skin care cosmetic application may have beneficial effects on skin elasticity and firmness and may have UVB protective effects by reducing the DNA damage, repairing the DNA damage and improving cell survival.

Bhargavi B Kola,

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, USA

Title: Title: Infantile hemangiomas
Speaker
Biography:

Bhargavi B Kola, MD, MPA is an Assistant Professor and Vice-Chairman for the department of Pediatrics at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. She completed her medical school training from Gandhi Medical College, India and her MD training from New York, USA. Dr.Kola has published up to 12 articles in peer-reviewed journals and has had posters presented at national and international level. She has been a peer reviewer and acted a judge for regional research competitions at University and State level.

Abstract:

Infantile hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms composed of proliferating endothelial-like cells that occur in approximately 10% of children. They are more common in Caucasians, girls, and premature infants. Most hemangiomas are cutaneous and uncomplicated, however about 12% may ulcerate, bleed, scar or cause functional impairment, requiring intervention. Most of the time, these cases require referral to specialists due to the fact that most pediatricians don’t feel comfortable treating them, especially that there are currently no uniform guidelines for treatment. This article sheds light on 3 different cases of hemangiomas that were presented in rural clinics and were treated with low dose propranolol. First case is an 8-month-old girl born prematurely at 32 weeks’ gestation and was noticed to have a small strawberry-colored tumor over the left side of her neck that was increasing in size rapidly.
The infant was referred to a pediatric dermatologist and was started initially on 0.25 mg propranolol daily and eventually dosage was increased to 0.5 mg twice a day. The growth was noted to stabilize over time however no significant reduction in size was observed. The second case presents an 8 week old girl, born full term, with no complications, came for her 2- month well-baby check up with complaints of prominent clear discharge from her right eye. MRI of the brain showed capillary hemangioma and the baby was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist. She was then started on propranolol 3 mg/kg/day that were eventually tapered to 2 mg/kg/ day. A follow up MRI 2 months later showed a slight reduction in the bulk of the hemangioma and the mass effect of the lesion to the right globe appeared to have improved after the propranolol treatment. The third case presents a 2-month-old girl, born full term with no complications. Her mother had first noticed an abdominal mass at about 4 weeks of age that was progressively increasing in size. The patient was referred to a pediatric dermatologist for hemangioma of the anterior abdominal wall and was started on propranolol 2.8 mg twice a day. A follow up ultrasound will determine the effect of Propranolol treatment. Propranolol seemed to have impressive effects on our cases, and even though its use has grown in the recent years, a consensus about dosages to regress or even stabilize the size of the tumors has not been reached. An algorithm that would assist pediatricians in managing such cases is crucial especially in rural areas were specialists are hard to get to.

Biography:

Mary F Matta has been working in the Dermatology and Venereology department of Ain-Shams University Hospitals since 2001 and has always shown great interest in using different lasers for treating skin problems. She has a great talent in communicating with patients and knowing their social and medical problems. She is In-charge of the Psoriasis Clinic. She has supervised a lot of researches and has published some of her work.

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Onychomycosis is both a cosmetic and medical problem and its systemic treatment have many limitations. The aim of this clinical study was to explore and evaluate the use of long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser 1064nm (Candela, Wayland, MA, USA) in the treatment of onychomycosis.
Methodology: Twenty Egyptian patients (18-60 years old) with 65 nails affected by onychomycosis were recruited consecutively from the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic, Ain-Shams University Hospitals over a period of 6 months. We excluded patients on topical or systemic anti-fungal therapy in the preceding 6 months, permanent or semi-permanent discoloration of the nail plate, any generalized skin disease, immunosuppressed patients and pregnant patients. Mycological examination of nail scrapings by direct KOH (20%) and culture was done together with photographing the nails before, one month and 3 months after treatment. Each patient received 4 laser sessions spaced 1 week apart. We used a fluence of 50J/cm2, pulse duration of 30 ms, spot size 3 mm and the cryo-spray was switched off. The nail plate was fully covered with laser irradiation 3 times in each session.
Findings: Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the commonest clinical type (85%) and yeasts represented 90% of the isolated fungi. After one month, 15 (75%) patients turned mycologically negative while 5 (25%) remained positive. However, 3 out of the 5 mycologically positive patients turned negative at the 3 months follow-up visit. This means that 90% of the patients and 52 (80%) of the nails achieved mycological clearance. Only mild pain was reported by all patients during and shortly after the sessions.
Conclusion: Long-pulsed Nd:YAG 1064 nm is a safe and effective treatment for single and multiple finger or toe nail onychomycosis

Speaker
Biography:

Juzer Abbasi has completed his MBBS from Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, India. He has achieved distinction in his Master’s course in UCSI University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia as well as High Distinction in Anti-Aging Medicine and Distinction in Aesthetic Medicine and Regenerative Medicine. He is currently working as a Project In-charge of Anti-Aging Centre at Seven Hills Hospital in Mumbai, India. He is also working in coordination with Dr. Pradeep V Mahajan at StemRx Bioscience Solutions Private Limited in providing the best therapies in Regenerative Medicine for various ailments as well as in many research activities in the field of stem cells and regenerative medicine.

Abstract:

Androgenic or androgenetic alopecia is a very frequent cause of hair loss affecting males over 50 years of age. For ages, wearinga cap which covers the frontal, parietal and upper parts of temporal and occipital areas of the scalp is commonly employed as a tradition in males. These areas coincide with the affected area in androgenic alopecia. Hence, a cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted to analyze the association between cap wearing habits and quality of life with androgenic alopecia among Indian male patients aged above 50 years. Skindex-29 was used as a tool to assess quality of life in these patients. Based on the results, we found no significant association between cap wearing habits and quality of life in Indian males with androgenic alopecia (p=0.348). But,quality of life was highly associated with the severity of androgenic alopecia among Indian male patients (p=0.003) indicating that the more severe the androgenic alopecia, the poorer is the patient’s quality of life. We also find that as the patient’s age increases, the more severe is the androgenic alopecia among Indian males (p=0.012). Also as their hours of cap wearing increases, their desire to undergo treatment for their androgenic alopecia also decreases substantially (p=0.001). Thus cap wearing frequency has no effect on quality of life in Indian males with androgenic alopecia. Severity of androgenic alopecia has a profound effect on quality of life among Indian male patients. With increasing age, the severity of androgenic alopecia also increases. Frequency of cap wearing has no effect on severity of androgenic alopecia. Increasing hours of cap wearing showed decrease in interest to seek medical treatment.

Biography:

Gabriella Baki is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. She serves as the Program Director and main Instructor in the BSPS Cosmetic Science and Formulation Design. She is a Pharmacist, graduated in 2008 from the University of Szeged, Hungary and also did PhD from the same university. Her research area focuses on cosmetics and personal care products as well as topical pharmaceutical products with the ultimate goals of enhancing consumer experience, patient adherence as well as product appeal and performance. She has made several technical presentations and over a dozen poster presentations. She has written 24 publications, has contributed to book chapters and had her first book, Introduction to Cosmetic Formulation and Technology, published by John Wiley and Sons last year.

Abstract:

Background: Skin infections occurs commonly and often present therapeutic challenges to practitioners due to the growing concerns regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial, viral and fungal strains. The antimicrobial properties of zinc sulfate and copper sulfate are well known and have been investigated for many years. However, the synergistic activity between these two metal ions as antimicrobial ingredients has not been evaluated in topical formulations.
Objective: The aims of the present study were to formulate topical creams and gels containing zinc and copper alone or in combination and to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the formulations and in vitro antibacterial activity in the formulations.
Methods: Formulation of the gels and creams was followed by evaluating their organoleptic characteristics, physicochemical properties and in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.
Results: Zinc sulfate and copper sulfate had a strong synergistic antibacterial activity in the creams and gels. The minimum effective concentration was found to be 3 w/w% for both active ingredients against the two tested microorganisms.
Conclusions: This study evaluated and confirmed the synergistic in vitro antibacterial effect of copper sulfate and zinc sulfate in a cream and two gels.